Quarterly Course Guide 2019-2020

Fall 2019

#
Instructor
Title
Day
Time
103Nguyen
First Yr Sem: Migration, Detention, & Sanctuary

Description: Description: Migration, Detention, and Sanctuary examines U.S. immigration policy and the carceral state alongside a history of the movement to protect undocumented citizens and racially, religiously, and sexually marginalized groups. Readings for the course include work from Critical Ethnic Studies scholars A. Naomi Paik, Dylan Rodriguez, Mae Ngai, and Lisa Lowe; Policy/Community Organizing Toolkits from the National Immigration Law Center and Immigrant Defense Project; and a range of multimedia artwork. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to U.S. foreign and domestic policies shaping contemporary struggles for immigration and prison abolition, and the fight for freedom in immigrant and refugee communities.

TTH 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM
210Nguyen
Introduction to Asian Am Studies

Description: Description: Introduction to Asian American Studies surveys major themes in the field through engagement with a variety of material including scholarship, comedy, film, cartoons, music, dance, reality television, visual art, and public protests from a wide range of disciplines. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to some of the major conversations in the field of Asian American Studies. Students will delve into the development of Asian American Studies as a discipline through an overview of the history of racial formation, migration, settler colonialism, U.S. militarization, gender/ sexuality, politics of representation, detention, incarceration, and political mobilization.

Distribution Requirement: Soc/Behav
TTH 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM
303San Diego
Asian Am Digital Cultures

Description: Description: From daily communications to magisterial announcements, from classrooms to war zones, from health records to national legislation, from labor to entertainment, and from dating, marriage, to everything in-between, how do certain institutions, spaces, subjects, and normalized practices reflect and reproduce hierarchies of race, gender, class, sexuality, nationality, and ability using electronically mediated technologies? How have glowing screens, code, and algorithms become so dominant—perhaps even necessary—to our lives, and how does this impact Asian American identities, communities, movements, and experiences? In this class, we will explore the multiscalar formations of Asian American digital cultures in the following ways: social media platforms, video games, advertising, viral videos and memes, “hook-up” apps, surveillance, privacy, “the right to not exist,” anti-fans, and sex work.

Distribution Requirement: Soc/Behav
TTH 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM
216Yuh
Global Asians

Description: Description: This is a comparative course that will examine the international migration histories of different Asian groups in the 20th century and the development of community and identity of those groups in different national contexts. We will interrogate the concept of diaspora versus migration versus immigration, and the different notions of identity implicit in each framework (diasporic community, sojourner, etc.). We will examine the immigration policies of host countries in Europe, the Americas, and Asia, and the settlement histories of Asians within these countries. We will discuss notions of group belonging and ideas of citizenship, nationality and ethnicity, and also compare how different ethnic groups and different national societies have handled ethnic/racial/cultural diversity. We will, in short, be examining the crossing and construction of multiple borders, the cultural encounters and the mixings, of various Asian groups in various socioeconomic and political contexts in different nation-states.

Distribution Requirement: Historical
MW 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM
360San Diego
Sexuality & Activism

Description: Description: This course examines “sexuality” as a dynamic node of power and knowledge. “Pleasure Activisms” explores how sexuality, race, gender, class, dis/ability, and citizenship function across institutions and social spaces like the media, family, school, government, clinic, nightclub, and “the everyday.” Following queer and feminist scholars of racialized sexualities, this course asks, “What does thinking about sexuality add to a discussion about politics? For instance, how do Asian American sexualities inform our thinking about how we understand, relate to, and imagine the world and what we want it to be?” Please be aware some texts and media might be too explicitly violent, graphic, or sexual for some students.

Distribution Requirement: Soc/Behav
TTH 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM
370Yuh
Korean Diaspora

Description: Description: The 20th century has been marked by upheaval and consequent migration for the people of the Korean peninsula. As a result of these migrations, substantial communities of ethnic Koreans exist in Central Asia, China, Japan, the United States and Canada, South America and Europe. How and why did Koreans go to these places? What kinds of communities and identities did they construct? How do these Koreans fit into the history of Korea, particularly in the context of a country divided into two opposing states? How do they fit into the history of their host countries? By examining the histories of ethnic Koreans outside the Korean peninsula, we will examine issues of migration, diaspora, race relations, and colonialism. We will also take a fresh look at modern Korean history by examining how these "overseas Koreans" view and relate to the history and ongoing politics of their divided homeland.

Distribution Requirement: Historical
MW9:30 AM - 10:50 AM

Winter 2020

#
Instructor
Title
Day
Time
214San Diego
Intro to Asian American History

Description: This course provides a broad survey of migratory and displacement patterns of those living in Asia as agitated by militarism, capitalism, imperialism, war, racism, sexism, classism, and nationalism stemming from within the region and abroad. What are the multiple and competing narratives of how these histories and experiences are produced? How are they evidenced and interpreted across multiple forms of visual, sonic, and textual ephemera? Once in the United States, how did similar—although not identical—processes of racialization, economic and labor exploitation, legislative and political exclusion, social and cultural othering, and strategies for survival and resistance work together to transform these heterogeneous populations into “Asian Americans”?

Distribution Requirement: Historical
TTH 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM
218Sharma
Asian Black Historical Relations in the U.S.

Description: Why do Asian Americans and African Americans seem to be incommensurably different groups? How can we understand the tensions between these communities? And where can we find evidence of past solidarity and commonality? This course offers an interdisciplinary, chronological, and thematic examination of the construction Asian and Black peoples in the U.S by tracing their entrance and experiences. What are the economic, social, political, and ideological causes of tensions—and alliances? Topics include: the historical and overlapping racialization and sexualization of Blacks and Asians; slavery and early immigration legislation; international “Afro-Asian” connections. We then focus on WWII as a crucible of new racial and economic dynamics that differentially locate Blacks and Asians in the post- war economy. In the second half, we examine the impacts of the 1965 Immigration Act and the devastating—and bifurcated effect—of 1970s deindustrialization on Americans that led to the myths of the “model minority” and “underclass.” We study ideologies that emerged from social movements of the 1960s and 1970s and the results of the Vietnam War to theorize race and identity beyond Black and White to reconceptualize inter-minority relations.

Distribution Requirement: Soc/Behav; Historical
MW 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM
225Nguyen
Refugee Aesthetics

Description: Refugee Aesthetics is a survey course that examines histories of racialization, war, forced migration, nation-state formation, humanitarian aid, and resettlement alongside questions of the politics of aesthetics, ethics of representation, and social justice. Students will explore how refugee aesthetics is broadly defined, performed, and contested through maps, graphic novels, films, textiles, performance art, theatre, visual art, music videos, and religious iconography. The course will offer students theoretical and creative practice-based frameworks of analysis to address historical and contemporary issues on refugees.

Distribution Requirement: Soc/Behav
TTH 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM
303Nguyen
Race, Mental Health, & Healing Justice

Description: Race, Mental Health, and Healing Justice explores how constructions of race, class, gender, and sexuality are intimately connected to issues of mental health and chronic illness in a range of institutional and societal settings. Readings for the coursework include Frantz Fanon, Esme Weijun Wang, Aurora Levins Morales, Mariame Kaba, DSM-V, and Alternatives to Calling Police During Mental Health Crisis. Drawing from postcolonial, black feminist theory, women of color theory, critical refugee studies, and disability justice, this course focuses on how healing justice as a theoretical and methodological framework offers openings to address issues of state violence and cultural disease to imagine and manifest healthier sustainable futures.

TTH 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM
303San Diego
Filipina/o/x American Cultural Studies

Description: What happens when you juxtapose the constantly shifting marker of “Filipina/o/x American” with the highly contested concepts of “literature,” "history," “art,” and “culture?” Rather than viewing these terms as predetermined givens to be represented or maintained, this class takes these terms as the conditions of possibility for cultural productions and aesthetic expressions by self-identified Filipina/o/x Americans so we can begin to ask not “What does it mean to be Filipina/o/x American?” but rather, “What do Filipina/o/x Americans do? What do Filipina/o Americans make?” Filipina/o/x American Cultural Studies introduces students to a broad survey of stories, plays, performances, films, music, and visual art by rebels, queers, misfits, outlaws, punks, nonconformists, “deviants,” and other similar figures who find power and pleasure as outcasts.

Distribution Requirement: Soc/Behav
TTH 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM
376Huang
Techno-Orientalism

Description: Techno-Orientalism names a variant of Orientalism that associates Asians with a technological future. This seminar will explore how Techno-Orientalist tropes are used by, played with, and rewritten by Asian American authors. We will study how twentieth-century and contemporary issues of technology, globalization, and financial speculation collide with a history of yellow peril and Asian Invasion discourse, as well as how these tensions manifest in figures and tropes such as robots, aliens, and cybernetics. Texts include poetry, novels, short stories, comics, and film.

Distribution Requirement: Lit & Fine Arts
MW 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM

Spring 2020

#
Instructor
Title
Day
Time
235Shankar
Language in Asian America

Description: How can we understand language use as an integral part of Asian American identities, communities, and racialization? This class offers introductory and intermediate theoretical concepts and studies on several aspects of language in Asian America, including: heritage language maintenance and loss, speaking "accented" English, the "English Only" movement, social and political representation, media representation, microaggressions, and the model minority stereotype. Class attendance and participation are required. Course materials include readings on Canvas, film, television, and social media; evaluation includes group projects, essays, and class presentations.

Distribution Requirement: Soc/Behav
MW 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM
247San Diego
Asian Americans & Pop Culture

Description: This survey course aims to introduce students to both historical and contemporary representations and expressions of Asian Americans in mainstream, independent, and alternative models of media. Such sites of production and reception include: documentaries, narrative film, television, print media, music, social media, the Internet, news, sports, and more. A central focus of this course will be the various tensions that emerge vis-à-vis multiple and competing interpretations about the meanings, purposes, and effects of media for/in/about Asian Americans.

Distribution Requirement: Lit & Fine Arts
MW 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
275San Diego
Intro to Asian American Literature

Description: This course is composed of two parts. The first is an introduction to foundational works of 20th-century Asian American literature. We will begin with the newspaper stories of Hisaye Yamamoto, continue with works on labor by Carlos Bulosan and Peter Bacho, and conclude with Maxine Hong Kingston's genre-defying The Woman Warrior. The second part is a study of contemporary texts: Chang-rae Lee's Native Speaker, Jhumpa Lahiri and Viet Nguyen's short stories, and Karen Tei Yamashita's Tropic of Orange.

Distribution Requirement: Lit & Fine Arts
TTH 9:30 PM - 10:50 PM
303San Diego
Asian Ams & Educational Equity

Description: Education, despite being touted as a great equalizer, is a highly contested site of struggle. Following that claim, this course explores three interlinked and overlapping themes for the quarter: 1) The emergence of ethnic studies in higher education; 2) The purpose and prevalence of critical pedagogy; 3) How queer and feminist ethnic studies intersects with current mobilizations in the areas of sex education and sexual assault prevention.

MW 11:00 AM - 12:20 AM
370Koul
South Asian Diaspora

Description: Why did South Asians migrate and settle outside South Asia? What are the historical origins of South Asian communities in Africa, South-east Asia, Europe, and North America? How did South Asia’s encounter with colonialism affect the migration of South Asians elsewhere? In this thematic survey, we will learn about the history of South Asians’ migration from the nineteenth century to the present, with special emphasis on the historical interrelatedness of migration, colonialism, and decolonization. Our cast of characters will range from soldiers and exiles to laborers and merchants living in areas ranging from Singapore and Fiji to Uganda and Britain. We will discover how South Asian communities in various parts of the world were made and unmade by colonial economic imperatives, often exploitative trans-oceanic labor networks, and colonial categories of social identification. Instead of being erased by mid-twentieth century decolonization, South Asians’ migration was reshaped by national imperatives of the ‘home’ country on the one hand, and the new political and economic order of the post-World War II world on the other.

Distribution Requirement: Historical
TTH 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM